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About the Nevada Report Card

  1. What are annual accountability reports?
  2. When is the annual accountability reports released?
  3. What is the Nevada Report Card?
  4. Do the school or district report cards contain accountability ratings or rankings of schools?

Using the Site

  1. What does “data suppressed due to FERPA regulations” mean?
  2. What is disaggregated data?
  3. How do we know that the information in the Report Card is accurate?
  4. Where can I find more information about State assessments?
  5. Where can I find more information about what defines a “Highly Qualified” Teacher?
  6. What is the “Cohort Graduation Rate”?
  7. How do cohort rates differ from previously reported graduation rates?

Parent's Guide to Report Card

  1. What information does the Accountability Report Card contain?
  2. How often must an Accountability Report Card be released?
  3. Where can I find more information about Nevada school districts and schools types in Nevada?
  4. As a parent, how can I use the information on the Accountability Report Card?

What are annual accountability reports?

Annual accountability reports contain detailed information about the schools and the districts in the State of Nevada, as well as public charter schools. They are produced in compliance with both State and federal law. These reports are used by a variety of stakeholders such as teachers and administrators, parents, community members, law makers, researchers, etc.

When is the annual accountability reports released?

Annual Accountability Reports are released middle of September of each year, together with the Nevada School Performance Framework reports, in compliance with State law.

What is the Nevada Report Card?

The Nevada Report Card is the accountability reporting website of the Nevada Department of Education. In compliance with federal and State law, it assists community members (parents, educators, researchers, lawmakers etc.) in locating a wealth of detailed information pertaining to K-12 public education in Nevada. Through the interactive Nevada Report Card website, you may access State, district and school level reports in three categories: “school and district information”, “assessment and accountability” and “fiscal and technology”. These legislatively mandated reports are also available in portable document format (PDF).

Do the school or district report cards contain accountability ratings or rankings of schools?

Yes. But more details on the ratings or rankings of schools in the Nevada School Performance Framework (NSPF) can be found via the “School Ratings” tab.

What does “data suppressed due to FERPA regulations” mean?

In reporting any type of student related data (i.e. demographic profiles), '-' indicates data were suppressed in order to protect privacy. Suppression rules apply to cell sizes of less than 10 students, and to other combinations of small cell sizes and percentages. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) require suppressing data to protect student privacy if numbers are less than a certain n-count.

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What is disaggregated data?

To disaggregate means to separate a whole into its parts. In education, this term means that results are sorted by groups of students. This practice allows parents and teachers to see how each student group is performing.

How do we know that the information in the Report Card is accurate?

While NDE engages in stringent and reasonable efforts to include accurate and up-to-date information on the NRC site, users should note that majority of the school and district data reported on this website were submitted by local school district officials. Therefore, data reported on this web site reflect district-submitted information, including any local corrections, received by the NDE by its reporting deadline.

Where can I find more information about State assessments?

More details about the Nevada Statewide Assessments can be found via the NDE Assessments link.

Where can I find more information about what defines a “Highly Qualified” Teacher?

Please visit the HQT webpage for more information about the “Highly Qualified” Teacher definition.

What is the “Cohort Graduation Rate”?

A graduation cohort is defined as the set of students that enter ninth grade in a given school year. A cohort graduation rate is the percentage of these students who graduate within a particular time frame, such as four years. The fall of 2011 was the first time the NDE reported the four year graduation rates for students of the graduating class of 2011 who entered high school in the 2007-08 school year. These rates are reported at the State, district and school levels, and are available at nevadareportcard.com

How do cohort rates differ from previously reported graduation rates?

The previously used method measured the percent of students leaving high school with a standard high school diploma. This rate was expressed as a proportion of all those students documented as leaving with a diploma, or with another completion credential or as a dropout. In contrast, the cohort graduation rate measures the percent of students entering 9th grade who graduate with a standard diploma within four years. In other words, cohort graduation rates look at a single cohort of students and follow their progress over four (or five in the adjusted cohort rate) school years, whereas the old method used only a single year of data on graduates and dropouts. Moreover, the cohort graduation rate takes into account students who transfer in and who transfer out of a particular school, whereas the old method looked at a single year of data and did not reflect changes in enrollment over time. Finally, cohort rates are measures of graduation within a particular time frame, while the old method did not specify a time limit for students to complete their diploma.

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What information does the Accountability Report Card contain?

NRS 385A.070 requires following to be reported in the district and state accountability report cards:

  • NRS 385A.200 Pupil achievement and school performance.
  • NRS 385A.210 Class sizes.
  • NRS 385A.220 Personnel employed by school district; designation of categories of personnel.
  • NRS 385A.230 Information on teachers, other licensed educational personnel and paraprofessionals.
  • NRS 385A.240 Attendance, truancy and transiency of pupils.
  • NRS 385A.250 Discipline of pupils.
  • NRS 385A.260 Graduation and drop-out rates of pupils; enrollment of pupils in remedial college courses.
  • NRS 385A.270 Pupils who are eligible for or receive free or reduced-price breakfasts or lunches;.
  • NRS 385A.280 Pupils who are English learners.
  • NRS 385A.290 Career and technical education.
  • NRS 385A.300 Curriculum; remedial and special programs.
  • NRS 385A.310 Fiscal information; technological facilities and equipment.
  • NRS 385A.320 District communication; parental involvement.
  • NRS 385A.510 Remedial and special programs.

How often must an Accountability Report Card be released?

State Law requires the report card to be updated annually, and be released publicly on or before December 31st of each year. School Ratings are to be released on or before September 16th of each year.

Where can I find more information about Nevada school districts and school types in Nevada?

You can find information about school districts in Nevada; and school types such as charter schools, homeschools, and private schools on the School and District Information via the Nevada School and District Information link or by visiting the State dashboard http://nevadareportcard.com/DI/nv and clicking on “Schools”.

As a parent, how can I use the information on my Accountability Report Card?

Accountability report card is designed to inform parents and the community, and can be used in many ways. You can use it to understand how your child’s school is doing and where it can improve. You can learn how to help your child improve and be on track to graduate. You can use the report card data to learn what steps the school is taking to help your student improve and succeed. You can interpret your child’s achievement on academic assessments that are aligned with State academic achievement standards. As you read the report card, consider the following questions and think about how much you know:

  • How much are you involved in your child's education?
  • How are your child and your child's school doing in math or science?
  • Are kids in your child's school reading and writing at grade level?
  • Are kids in your child's school performing at grade level in the tests?
  • How are students of different ethnicities doing?
  • How is your high school student doing in terms of getting college and career ready?
  • What are your student's plans after high school?
  • What should you attend your child's first parent teacher conference?
  • What special education services might be available for your child?
  • How can you help your high school student to graduate on time?
  • What do you know about your school's discipline policy?
  • How is your child feeling about bullying and other things about his/her school?
  • How are you as a parent involved in decision making about your child's school?
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